Carol (Missy) Cohen MPH, CHHC

Finding Energy – It’s More Than Just Choosing the Right Foods!

The first step to optimum health is making food choices that serve our unique bodies. Foods that are high in vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals that can be used to create energy that makes us look and feel great!

So, if you feel like you are choosing the foods that will do this for you. If you are listening to my mantra and incorporating those foods into your lifestyle. Lots of fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds. Don’t forget your healthy fats found in fish and the occasional piece of grass-fed organic beef. Yet you still are not losing weight and feel BLAH! Why is that?

To understand why you are consuming the right foods but still don’t have very much energy, let’s follow what happens after your food is consumed.

An Insider Look at Lunchtime in the Schools

I can’t believe that my youngest monster is starting his senior year tomorrow. If you have been following me, you are familiar with my son, Joshua, who we discovered is lactose intolerant while he was still in elementary school. Having a child with a food intolerance always makes social events interesting. You never know where a food that your child might not tolerate is lurking and the school lunches, despite drastic jumps in awareness and interest in our child’s health, are not always the best choices for our individual children. The truth of the matter is that we all just want our children to be happy, healthy and safe!

I am lucky to know Barbara Haimowitz. Barbara is a retired transitional kindergarten teacher. Because of her experience working in various schools, Barbara has insider information on exactly what gets eaten during school lunches and what many of the challenges are.

Are You Deficient in this Important Vitamin?

I just found out that my husband has low vitamin D. He is an Aquatics Director at a private health club in New England and spends the greater part of his summer being outside maintaining a pool and running camps.

How did this happen?

Despite what the food industry would have you believe, vitamin D is produced in our bodies when we are exposed to sunlight. In New England, we can only make vitamin D from this exposure from May until October because the sun has to be strong enough to allow us to absorb it’s rays.

Breakfast – the Most Important Meal of the Day!

If you eat a healthy breakfast complete with protein and healthy fats, then you will set yourself up for a great day with lots of energy and the ability to focus and stay on task.

If you choose to stop at the local coffee shop and eat a high carbohydrate breakfast, well… you will either be starving by 10 a.m. with lunch still two hours away or asleep at your desk.

Why does what we eat in the morning matter?

What do vegetables have to do with sex?

Did your mother tell you all sorts of strange things when you were a kid?  One of my favorites was, “stay away from the pigeons. They are dirty!” I can remember thinking, “it’s a bird. How dirty can it be?”

And, of course, there is the age-old adage that every mother shares, “Eat your vegetables!”

Why are vegetables so important and why do we have to eat them every day?!

Well, as it turns out, Mom was right. Vegetables are really important.

Did you develop aches and pains as you aged? Do your joints creak? Do you have regular headaches? High blood pressure? All these things are signs of oxidative stress.

Oxidative stress?! What is THAT?!

Juicing versus Blending – What is “Healthier”

What is better – juicing or blending? This is a question that is much debated in the wellness community and, I have to admit, one that I have gone back and forth a few times for my own personal health.

Generally, for day-to-day intake, I am much more likely to recommend “blending” to clients vs. juicing of vegetables and fruits.  There is a great advantage in benefiting from the entire spectrum of nutrition found in an apple or a stalk of broccoli, including the fiber and fiber-bound nutrients such as minerals.

Refrigerator Stir-Fry Surprise!

When I was in college, Wednesdays were my roommate, Dawne’s, turn to cook and she usually took whatever leftover vegetables we had, a can of beans and a pound of ground beef and threw it together. Voila! Hamburger surprise!

This recipe might be a tad more grown-up but no less fun. It comes from my friend, Tracy Harrison, at www.eatonpurpose.com. It’s an awesome recipe and a great way to clean out the refrigerator produce drawer and make use of veggie odd’n’ends.  If you don’t have the vegetables  recommended, substitute a chopped cup of whatever you do have on hand.  Be creative!

Three Bite Rule

Does getting invited to a holiday party put you into a cold sweat after all the hard work you have done to lose weight?

It doesn’t have to be that way!

The big focus of any party or gathering is getting to spend time with friends or families but there is no reason why you can’t enjoy the food. Take the time to scan the offerings and decide what you truly want to enjoy. Maybe it’s Grandma’s apple pie or a piece of your friend’s fudge. Whatever it may be, remember the “Three Bite Rule.”

Why 3 bites?

The first bite is going to be as enjoyable as you think it is going to be.

The second bite is still wonderful but not as wonderful as the first bite.

By the third bite, you have enjoyed the food as much as you are going to.

It is time to set it aside and hit the dance floor or visit with a friend.

Don’t be afraid of this time of year! Get out and enjoy yourself and please share with the community how you enjoy the holidays.

If I Eat Vegetarian, Where Do I Get My Protein?

As I teach a group of ladies the benefits of eating unprocessed foods and how it reduces the aches and pains, headaches, fatigue, stabilizes their blood sugar and improves their moods and anxiety, we talk a lot about the benefits of plant foods. Eventually someone in the group decides that they would like to eat a more vegetarian diet and the question comes up, “Where will I get my protein from?”

Just one excellent source of plant protein can be found in beans. Beans are packed with tons of fiber, as well as plenty of iron and protein. They are rich in antioxidants and phytonutrients. They are low in calories.

Plus, studies have found them to lower risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes.

There are several different types and varieties of beans. Creamy cannellinis, meaty garbanzos, sweet adzuki, tender pintos, and so many more—beans are one of the most powerful, nutrient-dense plant foods around.

 

What To Do With Beans